The ZRT Laboratory Blog

The ZRT Blog is an extensive resource for patients and health care providers searching for health and hormone testing information. Here, you can read about ZRT’s cutting edge research, advances in testing, wellness advice, and health industry highlights.



Margaret Groves

Margaret N. Groves, M.Phil., ELS is a scientific and technical writer for ZRT Laboratory. She researches the medical literature on topics relevant to ZRT testing products, contributes to the ZRT product information supplied to health care providers, and as part of the research team helps with writing up ZRT’s research studies for publication.


Recent Posts

Do Hormonal Contraceptives Increase Risk of Depression?

Posted by Margaret Groves on Saturday, 08 October

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Practical Takeaway: A recent study found the risk of depression with contraceptive use decreased with increasing age, and was highest in the youngest age group studied, namely teenagers aged 15-19, than in the women aged 20-34.

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Exercise – Good for Neurotransmitters & Your Brain

Posted by Margaret Groves on Wednesday, 17 August

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As the 2016 Olympic games play out in Rio, you might be feeling inspired to get moving yourself. While some sports admittedly look pretty dangerous, and we cringe at the sight of a cyclist skidding into the curb on a wet road and landing on her head, there are others that simply make us marvel at the agility and strength of the human body. For me, when I watch those swimmers cutting through the water at tremendous speed, I just want to get into a pool and see if I could really try to swim faster myself.

We’ve probably all heard by now that “sitting is the new smoking,” and that our health suffers greatly from inactivity. The human body was meant to be in motion at least for an hour or two a day, and this is known to keep the cardiovascular system tuned up as well as preventing excessive weight gain. But did you know that exercise affects levels of neurotransmitters in the body and can actually help you prevent or overcome disorders such as depression?

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Research Puts the "R" in ZRT

Posted by Margaret Groves on Friday, 15 April

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I have to admit, I believe that "research" is one of those words that I think is often misused today.

I started my own career in a cancer research lab, continued it in a pharmaceutical company research lab, and then got into medical information research and scientific writing, which meant using a range of medical literature databases and complex searching strategies.

My early research career was back in the days before we had personal computers, so many hours – in between tending to assays and experiments (as well as late in the evening) – were spent thumbing through the pages of massive volumes of Index Medicus, the print version of Medline, in various university libraries to find relevant publications.

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Book Review: The Role of Stress and the HPA Axis in Chronic Disease Management

Posted by Margaret Groves on Friday, 12 February

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It would not be an exaggeration to say that this book covers everything you need to know about the stress response system and how it affects our health.

Dr. Guilliams reminds us that only 80 years ago the concept of stress as a biological process, and how the stress response is regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, was yet to be elucidated. He takes us back to the pioneering discoveries of Hans Selye, who in 1936 published a letter in Nature entitled "A syndrome produced by diverse nocuous agents" and went on to describe the body’s response to stressors in terms of what he called a "general adaptation syndrome" in a monograph published in 1950.

While Dr. Selye certainly didn’t have all the answers, he laid the foundations for what became a vast area of research into phenomena that touch every biological system and affect every aspect of our health.

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