The ZRT Laboratory Blog

The ZRT Blog is an extensive resource for patients and health care providers searching for health and hormone testing information. Here, you can read about ZRT’s cutting edge research, advances in testing, wellness advice, and health industry highlights.

How Stress Caused My Cancer

Posted by Dr. Robert Zembroski on Thursday, 12 January

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After beating cancer, Dr. Zembroski (above) strives to prevent chronic disease in his patients. Hear his story on January 23.

"You have a 5-inch tumor in your chest" were the words spoken from a friend and radiologist as we both stared bewildered at my chest X-ray, following a host of side effects I'd been having for weeks.

As I looked at the X-ray film in amazement, my thoughts quickly changed to frustration and anger as I realized my behaviors and actions played a pivotal role in creating my disease—non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. 

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Looking Back: Popular Provider Blog Posts of 2016

Posted by ZRT Laboratory on Monday, 09 January

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As we step into 2017 ready to further our understanding of how hormone imbalance affects health, we wanted to take a brief moment to reflect on the top stories of 2016 that captured your attention on the ZRT Blog.

Following is a round-up of 2016's most popular posts for practitioners.


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Children’s Cancer – Let’s Talk About It

Posted by Dr. Alison McAllister on Friday, 30 September

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The month of September is known for both menopause month and children’s cancer awareness month. Many people commonly recognize the first but not the second.

I would just like to take a moment and talk about children’s cancer. This is not my typical blog about fun and the joy of science and research that I usually strive for. Don’t worry, I'll blog about the wonders of estrogen, thyroid, or testosterone soon I’m sure. The ZRT family however, has been touched by a child of an employee with cancer – Go Regan! – and sadly 1 out of 300 children will be diagnosed with cancer (under the age of 18). I personally have 3 friends whose children have had cancer and I’ve personally worked with families and been affected by their journeys.  Without awareness, there is no drive for funding of pediatric cancer research or pediatric cancer treatments which today is only 4% of the national research budget and almost zero of the pharmaceutical companies’ budgets. 

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On Prostate Cancer Prevention – Identifying Areas of Susceptibility

Posted by Dr. Allison Smith on Friday, 24 June

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In our current medical paradigm, screening for cancer is considered a preventive measure by virtue of providing an earlier diagnosis. Getting an early jump on a disease process like cancer makes treatment exponentially easier and outcomes generally better. Under the current guidelines, that early jump on prostate cancer starts at age 55 for men at low to moderate risk and 40-45 for men at high risk. It takes years for cancer to grow to a detectable point after the tumor's initial induction from a normal cell to a cancerous one. There's been a lot of research done to determine what those inducers are and how they work. Three of these inducers are simple to test for and completely modifiable with treatment and/or avoidance:

  • Bisphenol A
  • Arsenic
  • Catechol estrogens

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