The ZRT Laboratory Blog

The ZRT Blog is an extensive resource for patients and health care providers searching for health and hormone testing information. Here, you can read about ZRT’s cutting edge research, advances in testing, wellness advice, and health industry highlights.



Dr. Allison Smith

Allison Smith, ND is a Clinical Consultant at ZRT Laboratory.


Recent Posts

We Became a Running Family – How Exercise Can Turn the Tide in ADHD

Posted by Dr. Allison Smith on Thursday, 13 April

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“Our sons were both diagnosed with ADHD by kindergarten. More than just dealing with the disciplinary and academic issues at school, my husband and I struggled to maintain a productive and nurturing household with the kids having regular meltdowns and outbursts. Our ability to connect with them became compromised. We were at our wits’ end considering medications and home school. We agonized over the long-term repercussions of both of those choices. We turned inward and analyzed our habits and routines. One thing we noticed with both the boys was that a strict routine in the mornings and in the evenings seemed to help and that physical interventions (rather than reasoning or time-outs) worked best to correct behavioral problems – getting them outside, running them around, engaging them in a physical activity. There were particularly frenetic times when we would take them to the track at the local middle school and have them run laps. The more we intervened in that way, the fewer the outbursts and behavior issues and ironically, the better they’d sleep; but we were concerned that they would start seeing exercise as a punishment and decided to take a different approach. 

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5 Steps to a Healthier Brain in 2017

Posted by Dr. Allison Smith on Tuesday, 31 January

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We're in a new year now and it seems like everyone's weighing in on the 5 or 10 or 20 things you and I should be doing to improve our health and wellness this year. It is January, after all, and it’s time to start setting priorities. There are tons of great ideas out there! Here are my top 5 for 2017. If you want to improve brain health, you need to make sure it gets enough oxygen, nutrition, and anti-oxidant support so that’s the unifying theme. I have a feeling if everyone did these, in 20 years we’d have fewer cases of psychological dysfunction and of neurodegenerative disease. 

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Testing Urinary Neurotransmitters? Avoid the Big 5

Posted by Dr. Allison Smith on Thursday, 06 October

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Food is medicine. It’s well understood that the food we eat provides the amino acids, micronutrients (eg., vitamins and minerals) and macronutrients (proteins, fats and carbohydrates) we need to sustain our lives. However, it may come as a surprise to know that some foods contain more than just the amino acid precursors to neurotransmitters and actually contain high levels of some neurotransmitters themselves like serotonin1 and dopamine2. For some people, a diet rich in those foods that are high in neurotransmitters lends just the balance they need to feel well in lieu of psychotropic medication. As an example, someone who struggles with irritability and a low mood might try a diet rich in serotonin and vitamin B6-containing foods like bananas, walnuts and pineapples. But when you’re testing neurotransmitters in the urine, these foods in fact can cause problems with the testing.

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On Prostate Cancer Prevention – Identifying Areas of Susceptibility

Posted by Dr. Allison Smith on Friday, 24 June

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In our current medical paradigm, screening for cancer is considered a preventive measure by virtue of providing an earlier diagnosis. Getting an early jump on a disease process like cancer makes treatment exponentially easier and outcomes generally better. Under the current guidelines, that early jump on prostate cancer starts at age 55 for men at low to moderate risk and 40-45 for men at high risk. It takes years for cancer to grow to a detectable point after the tumor's initial induction from a normal cell to a cancerous one. There's been a lot of research done to determine what those inducers are and how they work. Three of these inducers are simple to test for and completely modifiable with treatment and/or avoidance:

  • Bisphenol A
  • Arsenic
  • Catechol estrogens

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